Month: February 2022

Posted on November 19, 2020 by Admin This year, the holidays will look different for all of us. If you are one of the more than 60 million caregivers in North America who look after an older adult inside the home, you may be wondering how to celebrate and stay safe.   Stay connected with others  Many people experience depression during the holidays due to stress and social isolation.
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With the support of generous donations from listeners and others, Mix 106.5’s 33rd annual Radiothon raised $1,361,137.33 for Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. The final total from the event, which took place last week, was announced on the radio station on Monday, Feb. 28. Radiothon is such an important event for everyone at the Children’s Center.
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South Korea reported its deadliest day of the pandemic as the country faces a surge due to the Omicron variant, recording 114 deaths on Sunday after the previous high of 112 deaths just 2 days before. In addition, 715 patients were hospitalized in severe or critical condition on Monday, up from about 400 a week
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This year’s Eating Disorders Awareness Week campaign calls for more robust training for GPs. Here we chat to Beat to learn more Eating disorders are complex mental health conditions. On the surface they may seem to be about food and weight, but dig deeper and you’ll see there’s a lot more going on. As someone
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When you go in to see the doctor, it’s typical to get a blood test to check lipid levels, your cholesterol and triglycerides. You likely know it’s important to lower bad cholesterol levels, because high levels increase your risk of heart attack. The same holds true for triglycerides. But what you might not know is
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A study of the nasal microbiome helped researchers predict recurrent polyps in chronic rhinosinusitis patients with more than 90% accuracy, based on data from 85 individuals. Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) has a significant impact on patient quality of life, but the underlying mechanism of the disease has not been well studied, and treatment
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Post-acute sequelae of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is estimated to affect about 2% of the population in the United Kingdom (UK). These long-term symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), also called post-acute COVID-19 syndrome, post-COVID-19 syndrome, long COVID, or post-COVID condition, cause functional impairment in the majority of those affected. COVID-19
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PHOENIX — Nearly three-fifths of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) achieved remission after treatment with dupilumab (Dupixent), researchers reported. In a 6-month study, 58.8% of adults and adolescents treated with dupilumab achieved histological remission compared to 6.3% in the placebo group (P<0.0001), according to Marc Rothenberg, MD, PhD, of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, in a pre-recorded
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Deep learning identified subgroups of patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) who may respond to disease-modifying therapy, researchers said. A trained model separated responders and non-responders across a range of predicted effect sizes, reported Jean-Pierre Falet, MD, of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, at the ACTRIMS Forum 2022, the annual meeting of the Americas
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Hearing sense could also be compromised during a bout with COVID-19. While researchers are still working on establishing if it’s a side effect of a SARS-CoV-2 infection, doctors have already acknowledged the incidence of hearing loss in some patients.  COVID-19 and Hearing Loss Ongoing research has already presented findings indicative of the SARS-CoV-2 virus infecting
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For many people, taking part in clinical trials or research studies is a popular idea. It can be a way to help advance science or cures, get free medical tests, and make some cash on the side…or get snared in a clinical trial scams. The race to find an effective COVID-19 treatment and vaccine increased
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Researchers are set to trial a non-invasive treatment for inoperable early-stage liver cancer, thanks to an injection of over $2 million in federal government funding. Led by Professor Alan Wigg from Flinders University’s College of Medicine and Public Health, the trial aims to test stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), a non-invasive technique that enables high
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Anecdotal reports have linked the vaccines against COVID-19 to the sudden loss of hearing in some people. But a new study has found no evidence for such a connection with any of the three approved shots.  The analysis of data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) found
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