Cancer

Welcome to our newest blog series, “Five Questions With…”  In this series, we will highlight the unsung heroes that make healthcare work. From guest services to the phlebotomist, the pet therapy volunteer, and the environmental services workers.  These individuals enhance our experiences when we are getting care and highlight human connection and support. Thank you for all
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When we think about cancers, and specifically treating cancers, we tend to think about targeting tumour cells directly with chemo- or radiotherapies. However, what makes targeting tumour cells even more complicated is that tumours don’t exist in isolation. They are surrounded by what’s called the tumour microenvironment. The tumour microenvironment is a kind of ecosystem
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Despite big improvements in survival, cancer is still one of the world’s biggest killers. Leading Cancer Research UK-funded scientists explain why it presents such a challenge – and look at how far we’ve come  Written by  Natalie Grover for Guardian Labs  Part of a pancreatic tumour seen down a microscope, with tumour cells labelled in
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Welcome to our newest blog series, “Five Questions With…”  In this series, we will highlight the unsung heroes that make healthcare work. From guest services to the phlebotomist, the pet therapy volunteer, and the environmental services workers.  These individuals enhance our experiences when we are getting care and highlight human connection and support. Thank you for all
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Welcome to our newest blog series, “Five Questions With…”  In this series, we will highlight the unsung heroes that make healthcare work. From guest services to the phlebotomist, the pet therapy volunteer, and the environmental services workers.  These individuals enhance our experiences when we are getting care and highlight human connection and support. Thank you for all
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Welcome to our newest blog series, “Five Questions With…”  In this series, we will highlight the unsung heroes that make healthcare work. From guest services to the phlebotomist, the pet therapy volunteer, and the environmental services workers.  These individuals enhance our experiences when we are getting care and highlight human connection and support. Thank you for all
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Normal squamous epithelial cells from the cervix under the microscope In January, we wrote about the changes to the cervical screening programme in Wales. This change extended the standard interval between screens for most people to 5 years. The change made headlines, with many people worried the longer interval would result in cervical cancers being
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Welcome to our newest blog series, “Five Questions With…”  In this series, we will highlight the unsung heroes that make healthcare work. From guest services to the phlebotomist, the pet therapy volunteer, and the environmental services workers.  These individuals enhance our experiences when we are getting care and highlight human connection and support. Thank you for all
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